CARS

From the showroom to your console

Driving cars requires a licence, cost a lot to maintain and insurance is high for all first time drivers. Which is why racing games such as Forza and Need For Speed are popular as they allow you to drive any car you desire. But how well do these games transfer the real statistics from the cars themselves, are they true to life or just a marketing ploy. After all the games need the manufacturers licence to use logo and the vehicles themselves. So here is how some cars match up with there virtual counterparts.

Honda S2000 CR (2009)

Actual Car

Virtual Counterpart

This is Honda’s sport car and its top speed is  155 mph which is not bad, but how does it fare against itself inside a video game. Well top speed for a stock model Honda S2000 is recorded at 167 mph,  thats 12 mph faster which may not seem a lot, if take the acceleration to get to the top speed into account.

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat (2015)

Actual Car

Virtual counterpart

 The Dodge Hellcat is a beast boasting a top speed 199 mph for a car worth  £40,000 that is a gear head dream come true. However in the virtual world this car goes even faster at a top speed of 207 mph, why the need for speed increase as this car sells itself.

Ford Mustang BOSS 302 (1969)

Actual Car

 Virtual Counterpart

A 1969 ford mustang is an amazing classic muscle car that has a top speed of 131 mph however it virtual reality version seems to be on steroids boosting itself to have a top speed of 155 mph. This is so much faster and is frustrating as such a car does not need extra speed to be competitive with other cars in its class.

Nissan Skyline GT-R V-SPEC (2002) 

 Actual Car

Virtual Counterpart

A boy racer favorite this cars top speed is 155 mph which doesn’t sound like a lot. However it boast a high acceleration to get to its top speed quickly. The top speed of its virtual counterpart is a much faster 175 mph. Again this shows us that the virtual counterpart is quicker.

My Thoughts

The video game versions of these vehicles are a lot faster then their real life counter parts, it shows us that the advertisement of a “true racing simulator” seem a bit far off. However does the extra speed make racing games more entertaining and engage our need to constantly go faster.